Languages, Literature, & Philosophy

Dr. Thomas Cooksey



Professor of English and Philosophy
Gamble Hall 130
912.344.2703
thomas.cooksey@armstrong.edu

Education
Ph.D., University of Oregon
M.A., California Polytechnic State University
B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara

Teaching Interests
World Literature, Romanticism and 19th-Century British and European Literature, Dante, Classics in Translation, Bible as Literature, the Novel, General Philosophy, Ethics, History of Philosophy, Asian Philosophies, World Religions, Literary Non-Fiction

Recent Publications
Plato’s Symposium: A Reader’s Guide, A Reader's Guide (2010) (London: Continuum Books)

GreenwoodIntroductions to Literary Masterpieces: Masterpieces of Non-Western World
Literature(Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2007)

GreenwoodIntroductions to Literary Masterpieces: Masterpieces of Philosophical
Literature(Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2006)

“‘The Man of the Day to Follow’: Dani Kouyaté’s Kieta! and the Living Epic.” Literature/Film Quarterly,  37.4 (2009), 262-269

“The Transfiguration of Old Fritz: Münchhausen and the Fridericus Series. ”  In The Legend Returns and Dies Harder Another Day: Essays on Film Series, ed. by Jennifer Forrest.  (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2008)

“‘Been believing in nothing’: Flannery O’Connor Reads Simone de Beauvoir.”  Flannery O’Connor Review 2 (2003-2004)

“Pope, Eloisa, and Milton: a Possible Source.” Notes and Queries 51:1 (March 2004)         

“Rossetti’s Intellegenza nova: Perception, Poetry, and Vision in Dante at Verona.”  Victorian Newsletter 66 (1984): 10-13.  Rpt. in Poetry Criticism.  Ed. Allison Marion.  Vol. 44.  Detroit:  Gale. 2003.

“Robert Sanderson.” British Rhetoricians and Logicians, 1500-1660 (Second Series), ed. Edward Malone.  Dictionary of Literary Biography 281.  Detroit: Gale Research, 2003, 274-283.

“Lyotard, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!  Metanarrative in the Beast Fable as (Pre)Postmodern Site.” International Perspectives on English and American Language and Literature 2 (Tallinn University of Education Sciences, 2002)

“Jonson’s Volpone: A Double Source in Petronius’ Satyricon..”  Notes and Queries  47:1 (March 2000)